Diabetic foot ulcer, 3D illustration showing common location of diabetic ulcer lesions

Diabetic Foot Care

Preventive Program (Primary Care)

Secondary Care( Immediate urgent management of Foot Ulcer and wound in diabetic patients)

Tertiary Care(Function sparing small amputations with proper rehabilitation programs)

  • Foot wear modification
  • prosthesis
  • off loading cast

Medical Specialist/ Endocrinologist

Backup in specific situations with ICU/HDU backup.

Foot infections are common in the diabetic patient. Early recognition, proper assessment, and prompt intervention are vital. A combination of surgery and antibiotics is mandatory in virtually all foot infections. The aim of surgery is 2-fold: first, to control the infection, and second, to attempt to salvage the leg. The eventual goal is always to preserve a functional limb. Foot deformities resulting from surgery may cause reulceration and a high morbidity. The surgical treatment of the infection largely consists of draining of pus and removal of all necrotic and infected tissue. Frequently, revascularization of the foot is needed to save the limb; thus, there must be a close cooperation with the vascular surgical service. The surgeon must have a thorough knowledge of foot anatomy and must be familiar with the defects in wound healing that are caused by diabetes. The outcome of surgery mainly depends on the skill, care, and experience of the surgeon. The best results are achieved within a multidisciplinary setting.

Infection of the foot in diabetic patients is a serious complication that may lead to a major amputation. Early recognition and proper treatment are mandatory to avoid poor outcomes. Surgery must always be combined with antibiotics, and revascularization may also be necessary. The surgeon must have a thorough knowledge of the foot anatomy but also must be familiar with the defects in wound healing caused by diabetes. The outcome of surgery largely depends on the skill, care, and experience of the surgeon.